India Transformed: 25 Years Of Economic Reforms By Rakesh Mohan -Book Review

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India Transformed Book ReviewIndia Transformed: 25 Years Of Economic Reforms

India Transformed: 25 Years of Economic Reforms:- India Transformed: 25 Years of Economic Reforms, is edited by Mohan and is a collection of articles on various subjects in Indian economics that carry analyses of what has happened over the last 25 years. This book comes on the heels of Yashwant Sinha’s collection of essays on the same subject, having some common authors as well. Mohan’s emphasis is on industrial policy, and he gives a backdrop of both the situation as it was before 1992 and the change that was sought. For readers who are not aware of the country before 1992, some of the rules and regulations that existed would sound hilarious, especially when one reads about the number of ministries and departments required when investment was involved or forex required. The economy has definitely made significant progress in terms of unshackling of industry even though India still remains fairly low on the World Bank’s ‘doing business’ scale. An account is provided by Montek Singh Ahluwalia, who was one of the brains behind the implementation of reforms. It is fairly factual and takes us through some of the subtle nuances of what reforms involved. Omar Goswami has two essays, one on a ‘before’ and ‘after’ treatise, which would again be eye-openers for the new generation which may not be aware of telephones or bank tokens. For instance, he narrates the controls that existed in the textile sector, where one had to use cotton and could blend man-made fibres, but not use the latter completely. This led to companies finding innovative ways to circumvent the rules. His second essay is on corporate India, where Goswami shares that reforms have churned corporate India and efficiency has increased. If one juxtaposes this with Mohan’s essay, where India appears to have progressed over the years, the question not posed is, why we still seem to be low on the World Bank’s index of ease of doing business. This is a gaping lacuna that is not captured by the authors. The section on human development has articles by the likes of Nachiket Mor and Devesh Kapur, which are quite incisive. The financial sector is well evaluated by C Rangarajan, who is probably one of the best in the field, and Deepak Parekh, who is an expert on the subject of housing finance. The last part on corporate India has essays by Mukesh Ambani, Naushad Forbes, Gita Piramal and Rama Bijapurkar, which make for engaging reading. Having successful people present their views on various aspects of business is like hearing the story from those who have made it big and can’t be contested.
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On the whole, this book should interest all kinds of readers. The author writes with his usual flair, which is quite droll, especially when he narrates anecdotes of how bureaucrats and ministers loathed change just because of limited understanding of reforms. However, there does not appear to be any criticism of reforms in terms of what has not been done or why growth has not created jobs commensurately or why there are still many poor people in the country. Hence, one may not get a balanced view on reforms and will not be able to reconcile reality with the image of successful reforms.

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